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Red Storm Over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (Modern War Studies)

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Red Storm Over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (Modern War Studies)

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    Available in PDF Format | Red Storm Over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (Modern War Studies).pdf | English
    David M. Glantz(Author)
Germany's Eastern Front in World War II saw many campaigns and battles that have been ""forgotten"" by a Soviet Union that tried to hide its military failures. The Red Army's invasion of Romania in April and May 1944 was one such campaign, which produced nearly 200,000 casualties and tarnished the reputations of its commanders. The redoubtable David Glantz, the world's leading authority on the Soviet military in World War II, now restores this tale to its proper place in the annals of World War II. Working from newly available Russian and long-neglected German archives - plus Red Army unit histories and commanders' memoirs - Glantz reconstructs an imposing mosaic that reveals the immense scope and ambitious intent of the first Iasi-Kishinev offensive. His re-creation shows that Stalin was not as preoccupied with a direct route to Berlin as he was with a ""broad front"" strategy designed to gain territory and find vulnerable points in Germany's extended lines of defense. If successful, the invasion would have also eliminated Romania as Germany's ally, cut off the vital Ploiesti oilfields, and provided a base from which to consolidate Soviet power throughout the Balkans. Glantz discloses General Ivan Konev's strategic plan as the 2nd Ukrainian Front prepared its Iasi offensive and fought a climactic battle with the German Eighth Army and its Romanian allies in the Tirgu-Frumos region in early May, then the regrouping of General Rodion Malinovsky's 3rd Ukranian Front for its decisive offensive toward Kishinev, which aborted in the face of a skillful counterstroke by a threadbare German Sixth Army. Glantz describes how the Wehrmacht, with a nucleus of combat veterans, was able to beat back Soviet forces hampered by spring floods, while already fragile Soviet logistical support was further undermined by the Wehrmacht's scorched-earth strategy. Although Konev's and Malinovsky's offensives failed, the Red Army managed to inflict heavy losses on Axis forces, exacerbating the effects of Germany's defeats in the Ukraine and making it more difficult for the Wehrmacht to contain the Soviet juggernaut's ultimate advance toward Berlin.

"Glantz is once again at the top of his form." -- Dennis Showalter"Glantz's study corrects a sixty-year misinterpretation of Soviet Army operations along the Romanian approaches to the Balkans in 1944 and adds tremendously to our understanding of the war's conduct in the east." -- Roger Reese"With his usual command of the sources and devotion to detail, Glantz once again brings to light a little-known episode of the struggle on the Eastern Front.... Essential reading for students of World War II." -- Richard L. DiNardo"Glantz's study corrects a sixty-year misinterpretation of Soviet Army operations along the Romanian approaches to the Balkans in 1944 and adds tremendously to our understanding of the war's conduct in the east."--Roger Reese, author of Red Commanders: A Social History of the Soviet Army Officer Corps, 1918-1991 "With his usual command of the sources and devotion to detail, Glantz once again brings to light a little-known episode of the struggle on the Eastern Front. . . . Essential reading for students of World War II."--Richard L. DiNardo, author of Germany and the Axis Powers: From Coalition to Collapse "Glantz is once again at the top of his form."--Dennis Showalter, author of Patton and Rommel: Men of War in the Twentieth Century-Glantz's study corrects a sixty-year misinterpretation of Soviet Army operations along the Romanian approaches to the Balkans in 1944 and adds tremendously to our understanding of the war's conduct in the east.---Roger Reese, author of Red Commanders: A Social History of the Soviet Army Officer Corps, 1918-1991 -With his usual command of the sources and devotion to detail, Glantz once again brings to light a little-known episode of the struggle on the Eastern Front. . . . Essential reading for students of World War II.---Richard L. DiNardo, author of Germany and the Axis Powers: From Coalition to Collapse -Glantz is once again at the top of his form.---Dennis Showalter, author of Patton and Rommel: Men of War in the Twentieth Century�Glantz's study corrects a sixty-year misinterpretation of Soviet Army operations along the Romanian approaches to the Balkans in 1944 and adds tremendously to our understanding of the war�s conduct in the east.�--Roger Reese, author of Red Commanders: A Social History of the Soviet Army Officer Corps, 1918-1991 �With his usual command of the sources and devotion to detail, Glantz once again brings to light a little-known episode of the struggle on the Eastern Front. . . . Essential reading for students of World War II.�--Richard L. DiNardo, author of Germany and the Axis Powers: From Coalition to Collapse �Glantz is once again at the top of his form.�--Dennis Showalter, author of Patton and Rommel: Men of War in the Twentieth Century

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Book details

  • PDF | 424 pages
  • David M. Glantz(Author)
  • University Press of Kansas (30 Dec. 2006)
  • English
  • 3
  • History

Review Text

  • By Dave History Student on 2 June 2011

    In the first two chapters, an overview of the Winter 44 campaign in southern Ukraine as well as the battle action in the northeast corner of Romania, which will last until the first week of June, is given to prepare the reader for the upcoming detailed accounting. The key Front commanders of the Russian side is Konev and Malinovsky while on the German side will be Woehler, Manteuffel and Knobelsdroff. There are many others mentioned from both sides but these are the key officers. A decent bio is given for each person as well as having a photo. This accounting is Russian-centric and there is more information given about the their commanders and their forces as compared to the Axis side. Though there are repeated attacks covered, there is basically only two general areas of fighting: Along the southern Dnestr River and in the Tirgu-Trumos area.Battle action starts in early April and will run until early June with Konev's 2nd UF repeatedly attacking along the Tirgu-Frumos axis that will include battles at Podu-Iloaie, Iasi, Tirgu-Neamt, Pascani and of course Tirgu-Frumos sectors. Also in April, Malinovsky's 3rd UF, after liberating Odessa, will attack the German defenses along the Dnestr River between Tiraspol and Grigoriopol. It will also cover the battles for Orgeev and Dubossary. At the start of the campaign both Front commanders are confident of success but the determination and knowledge of mobile warfare by the Germans will frustrate and deny the Russians their victory. The main German forces were 6th and 8th Armies.The detailed operational coverage is excellent, comparable to the author's Leningrad or Kursk books but not as good as his two new Stalingrad books. As usual the author will describe the basic plan, give the step by step action of the battle or campaign and then analyze the results. For anybody who has read and liked Glantz will like this book for its format and style is exactly like his other books. Interspersed with the author's dialog are many fragments of after action reports which helps the reader get a feel of what the commanders were experiencing. High praise is given to Grossdeutschland Division and 24th PzD which consistently throughout the entire period stopped the Russians at every encounter. After the first week of June, Konev calls off his failed offensive for Operation Bagration is about to start and his Front will no longer have priority but he will regroup and start his offensive again in August.In Conclusions Mr Glantz states that the two Russian Fronts had the potential to defeat the inferior German forces but due to their overconfidence and lack of coordination between the two Fronts victory alluded them.There are ten tables and 32 maps. Most of the maps appear to be authentic war maps; some were quite busy and a magnifying glass will help. The maps are essential for better understanding of the battle narrative. (Rolf Hinze's new book, "Crucible of Combat" is due to be published and part of his book covers these two campaigns. I'm anxious to see if his maps and battle coverage will add to the coverage of this book.) There is a useful Appendix with Russian directives. There is also a series of Orders of Battle and photographs of most of the key players. A 16 page Notes section, a 5 page Bibliography and a Index completes the book.For 1944, these campaigns were extremely important for German forces for it stopped two Fronts from advancing, gave them a little breathing room and gave them a shot of pride when it was most needed. In addition to providing great details of the operations, the profiles of the many Soviet commanders is also interesting and informative, giving credit to many lesser known officers. Mr Glantz takes these campaigns seriously and does a fine job of reinacting ithem. If you have an interest in this Russian offensive or an interest in the operational ground phase of battle then you should consider this book. Its highly recommended.

  • By Carrosio Roberto on 26 May 2014

    Who knows David Glantz , knows already which kind of marvellous books , he is getting used to write, for who doesn't know him, I can say that this book is a complete research book based on both sides of the story, absolutely fully documented and based on first hand accounts.The story is about the failed Soviet invasion of Romania (and of the Balkans) on Spring 1944.The Soviets were coming after 9 months of continuos successful offensives (after the battle of Kursk) and they were thinking to be unstoppable, so the Stavka chose the 2nd and the 3rd Ukrainian Fronts to invade Romania and after, all the Balkans.Instead , they failed with huge losses.As usual , the history is written by the winners and this offensive has been cancelled in the "official history", and as usual, David Glantz, using a lot of unknown diaries and documents, reconstruct the real development of the actions of both sides, writing another page of true deep history.Wonderful!

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