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Religion and Literature in Western England, 600-800 (Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England)

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Religion and Literature in Western England, 600-800 (Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England)

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    Available in PDF Format | Religion and Literature in Western England, 600-800 (Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England).pdf | English
    Patrick SIMS-WILLIAMS(Author)
Even the Venerable Bede knew little about the two Anglo-Saxon kingdoms described in this book. In the sixth and seventh centuries the pagan peoples of the Hwicce and Magonsaetan occupied the frontier from Stratford-upon-Avon as far as the Welsh kingdoms west of Offa's Dyke. They retained their own kings, aristocracy and independent monasteries into the eighth century. Using archaeological, place-name and historical sources, Dr Sims-Williams describes the early conversion to Christianity of these people, the origins of the dioceses of Worcester and Hereford, and the precocious growth of Anglo-Saxon monasticism. Drawing on many neglected documents he reveals a wide range of Continental, Irish and Anglo-Saxon influences on the church and shows that the monasteries were as varied in character as the Northumbrian foundations described by Bede.

a formidable proficiency in questioning his material from different angles, literary, palaeographical, linguistic, onomastic, archaeological. -- English Historical Review.a measured judgment which seems almost unfailing whether the issue be linguistic, literary, archaeological or merely historical -- Times Literary Supplement.material on the geology, archaeology, and boundaries that should be read carefully by all interested in early settlement patterns. -- Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies.virtually creates a subject that, given its dating framework, might have seemed not to exist. . . . -- American Historical Review. --This text refers to the Printed Access Code edition.

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  • By DR ROBERT BATES on 19 November 2014

    not the easiest of reads but very informative

  • By Godzilla on 24 September 2011

    This book was published in 1990 (448 pages)In the sixth and seventh centuries pagan peoples who were known as Hwicce and Magonsaetan arrived from unknown parts of Europe and settled the frontierland of the "Welsh Marches" from Warwickshire as far as the Welsh kingdoms west of Offa's Dyke & perhaps also along the Wye Valley. They retained their own kings, aristocracy and independent monasteries up until the eighth century. Dr. Patrick Simms-Williams, professor of Celtic Studies at Abersytwyth University focusses mainly on the literary documents, and on some of the archaeology, excluding Anglian-Mercian sculptures; & perhaps not fully exploring other hypotheses of non-Saxon, non-Celtic provenance. These 2 tribes were able to meld with the Dobunni and other Celtic tribes, yet they were not Celts.Simms-Williams describes the Christianising of the Hwicce or Wigge peoples (whose name I personally interpret as being the "warriors"). He reviews the origins of diocesan Worcester and Hereford, and the very early flowering of monasticism among the Hwicce and Magonsaetan. Could there be some link with Maguntium - Mainz? and/or other displaced tribes who were potentially not Anglo-Saxon but perhaps Jutish-related. The Dark Age history of this part of Britain went sadly unrecorded by Bede, Gildas and others. We know little of the identity of these noble elites and king-lines and nothing of their provenance. Their absorption into the Anglo-Saxon heptarchies; was not total, even after the 800's.

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